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  • Writer's pictureCristina Casalis

Romagnano House

Updated: Apr 11


Casa Romagnano, picture of Marco Saroldi, 2010. © MuseoTorino.
Casa Romagnano, picture of Marco Saroldi, 2010. © MuseoTorino.

Romagnano House is an historical building located in the city centre of Turin.

It was built in the 14th century and it belonged to the Romagnano family, Marquis of Romagnano, also known as Arduinici. Their political influence persisted even under the supremacy of the Savoy family with the Marquis Antonio Romagnano who was chancellor of the Duke of Savoy Ludovico, between 1449 to 1458.

The Romagnano Family played an important role as ambassadors for the Savoy court hosting in their house the Venice’s Ambassador Andrea Morosini.

During the renovation of the building in 1885 by the architect Riccardo Brayda, the terracotta decorations were brought to light revealing the presence of previous windows.

Detail of the ogival window, picture of Paolo Gonella, 2010. © MuseoTorino.
Detail of the ogival window, picture of Paolo Gonella, 2010. © MuseoTorino.

It was the first civil building in Turin medieval to be affected by a deep recovery with a precise report of the work. From the excavation appeared that the original building had a colonnade with at least four arches which developed on the extension of the alley.

Nowadays the building bears few testimonies of his past, but it is possible to recognize the remain of the terracotta frames of the ogival windows which show representations of acorns, small pumpkins and oak leaves. These decorative patterns are similar to the one of the Savoy Castle and underline not only the wealth of the Romagnano family, as evidence of the aristocrat family, but also the will to affirm their social prestige into the Savoy court.

Details of the terracotta frames
Details of the terracotta frames

The main facade is located in via dei Mercanti and the side facede overlooks an alley closed but that in the medieval period it was one of the lanes of the medieval city.

Main facade
Main facade
Side facade
Side facade

This side retains interesting fragments of herringbone masonry and a full walled ogival window.

The lower floor shows traces of cross windows in terracotta dating back to the 16th century.

The remaining openings where made in 17th century without taking in consideration the original decorations.





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